Network-based language teaching

Year: 
2008
Month: 
Authors: 
R. Kern;P. Ware;M. Warschauer
Journal/Conference: 
Encyclopedia of language and education
Abstract: 
"Over the past 20 years, computer networks have introduced unprecedented opportunities for language learners to access and publish textsand multimedia materials and to communicate in new ways within andbeyond the classroom. Whereas computer-assisted language learning(CALL) refers broadly to a wide range of applications (e.g., tutorials,drills, simulations, instructional games, tests, concordancers, etc.),network-based language teaching (NBLT) refers specifically to thepedagogical use of computers connected in either local or globalnetworks, allowing one-to-one, one-to-many, and many-to-many communication. NBLT research explores what happens when learners arebrought together with texts, media, and other speakers of the languagein computer-mediated contexts of interaction."
Full text: 
Yes
Relevant: 
No
Empirical: 
No
Comments: 
Appropriateness of research design: 
0
Appropriateness of methods/analysis: 
0
Generalisability: 
0
Can findings be trusted in answering RQs: 
0
Total: 
Main conclusions from paper: 
"Although the potential role of NBLT is thus greater than ever before,research has also shown that sound pedagogy and not computers or networks per se is what really counts in NBLT. Future success will thusrequire teachers’ continued attention to the close integration of projectgoals, activity/task design, and technology interface within oftencomplex logistical realities. Teachers also need to know how NBLTcan constrain as well as enhance their students’ language use andknow when it is better not to computerize a particular activity. Thegrowing complexity of decisions involved in NBLT highlights the importance of technology integration in both preservice and inserviceteacher education."